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Five ideas for your home

Minor enhancements & upgrades that made a major difference. Secrets to steal from our featured home.

LET THE SUN SHINE IN
Arched dormers, a French-inspired roofed structure with a window, projects vertically or horizontally beyond the plane of a sloping roof. It is an architecturally appealing design element that serves many purposes, such as exposing light into attic space or into a bedroom loft alcove.

 

LOWCOUNTRY NATIVE
Cypress, a softwood indigenous to the Southeast that’s especially popular in the Lowcountry, has a very fine grain and is a rich golden color when milled. Local builders may varnish the wood to retain its golden hue, while others paint and stain it for a darker look on beams, mantels, cabinetry and crown molding.

 

FAR FROM TACKY
Carriage houses, an outbuilding that dates back in this country more than 250 years ago, originally served to house horse-drawn carriages and tack, with occasional staff living quarters on the second floor. Today, precious automobiles are stored on the ground floor, with guest suites, offices and workshops converted above.

 

FIGHTING GRIME
Mudrooms, a small transitional space from the outside to the inside, certainly are functional for helping to keep a home clean, and for hanging jackets, hats and sports gear. But it doesn’t have to be an architectural afterthought: Think design features like beadboard paneling, stylized benches, and Lowcountry hues of greens and blues.

 

UNDER THE SOUTHERN INFLUENCE
Gulf Coast Creole, French Acadian and their architectural sister, the Lowcountry, were all borne by demands of the hot, humid, southern climate. Design influences they share are covered front and back porches, raised foundations to protect against water damage, high ceilings, double-hung windows for improved air circulation, metal roofs and two-sided single chimneys.